May 15, 2021

This book explores the discourse on conflict prevention and peacebuilding by bringing together researchers from China and Switzerland over a series policy dialogues. The Charter of the United Nations, adopted in the immediate aftermath of World War II, is clear about the fundamental necessity for the international community to act in partnership to prevent violent conflict. Given recent shifts in global power dynamics, there is an apparent need for international policy issues to be addressed in ways that are inclusive of a wider variety of perspectives and approaches. Chinese policy actors are increasingly interested in fostering their own discourse on issues of prevention and peacebuilding, rooted in Chinese experience, and engaging with peers from other contexts. The chapters in this volume explore the rationale for conflict prevention and review prevailing academic and practitioner discourses on fundamental questions such as the rationales for why conflicts should be prevented and whether ‘mainstream approaches’ are still relevant.

New Paths and Policies towards Conflict Prevention: Chinese and Swiss Perspectives Edited By Courtney J. Fung, Björn Gehrmann, Rachel F. Madenyika, Jason G. Tower
Routledge, 2021 https://www.courtneyfung.com/research-1#edited-book


Dr. Courtney J. Fung is an associate professor of International Relations and concurrently an associate-in-research at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University and an associate fellow in the Asia-Pacific Programme at Chatham House/The Royal Institute of International Affairs. Her research focuses on how rising powers, like China and India, address the norms and provisions for a global security order.  She is particularly interested in how status affects these states as they address United Nations peacekeeping, intervention, and emerging norms, like the responsibility to protect.  Her 2019 Oxford University Press book explains China's varied response to intervention at the United Nations Security Council.  Her research was most recently supported by a Hong Kong Research Grants Council Government Research Fund grant (GRF) and a Hong Kong Research Grants Council Early Career Scheme (ECS) award.  Prior research funding included grants from the Konosuke Matsushita Memorial Foundation and the Scaife Foundation.