EVENT WITH CKGSB IN NYC

Tue, Oct 3, 2017, 8:15 am to 5:30 pm

Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business (CKGSB), 长江商学院; is a private, non-profit, independent educational institution and the only business school in China with faculty governance.


STATE STRATEGIES UNDER GLOBAL RULES: EXPLAINING THE RISE OF CHINESE STATE CAPITALISM - CWP FELLOW YELING TAN

Wed, Oct 11, 2017, 4:30 pm

Yeling Tan CWP Lecture October 2017

Tan YelingDescription

When China joined the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2001, conventional wisdom held that global trade rules would act as a credible commitment to domestic reform, generating a “disciplining” effect on state behavior that would restrain Chinese industrial policymaking. And indeed, initial assessments of Chinese economic policy in the early 2000s pointed to the emergence of what might be called a regulatory, market-oriented state. By the second half of the decade, however, scholars were increasingly calling attention to a “rise of industrial policy” and the growing assertiveness of a Chinese “state capitalism”. What lies behind these seemingly contradictory assessments? In this talk, I seek to answer two questions: First, why did the rise of market-oriented institutions in response to WTO entry not constrain the subsequent activism of more interventionist developmental agencies? Second, what explains the timing of these non-linear policy trajectories?

Dominant approaches in international political economy commonly treat the state as a unitary actor, and in particular, tend to ‘black-box’ the behavior of the central state as sovereign representative. In my explanation, I disaggregate the Chinese central state into its major agencies and unpack the divergent policy consequences of relying on WTO rules as a credible commitment to reform. Specifically, this divergence turns on the durability of global trade rules and the political relationship between China’s party and its state. I demonstrate that rather than a uniform convergence to liberalization, WTO rules have intensified the competition within the central state over the direction of economic policy. The result is an enhanced dualism in the governance of the Chinese economy, with intensified market competition promoted by one set of central economic agencies, yet a more consolidated industrial policy promoted by rival agencies.

Bio

Yeling Tan is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program (starting Fall 2017). In the fall of 2018, she will join the Department of Political Science at the University of Oregon as an Assistant Professor. Her research interests are in international and comparative political economy, with an emphasis on China and the developing world.
Her dissertation, State Strategies under Global Rules: Chinese Industrial Policy in the WTO Era, examines the divergent strategies that the Chinese state adopted in response to global trade rules that demanded far-reaching modifications to its domestic policies and institutions. This project is part of a long-term research agenda on the domestic politics of globalization in authoritarian states such as China and on the multifaceted strategies deployed by these states to respond to and shape global economic rules. Her research also examines what, in the absence of electoral pressure, causes authoritarian institutions to adapt and evolve.

Prior to her graduate studies, Yeling worked in the public and non-governmental sectors in a range of roles including: global governance and governance innovations research at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy; international development projects at The Asia Foundation; and international security policy in the Singapore Government.

Yeling holds a Ph.D in Public Policy from Harvard University (expected Summer 2017) and an MPA in International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School. She received her B.A. with distinction and honors in International Relations and Economics from Stanford University.

Location:
A71 Louis A. Simpson Int'l Building

Audience:
Open to the Public

Speaker(s):
Dr. Tan Yeling


 

"CHINA'S HISTORY OF FAILED INTERVENTIONS IN NORTH KOREAN ELITE POLITICS" - CWP FELLOW JOSEPH TORIGIAN

Wed, Nov 8, 2017, 4:30 pm

Joseph Torigian

Joseph Torigian HeadshotDescription:

Before becoming president, Donald Trump asserted that he "would get China to make that guy [North Korean leader Kim Jong Un] disappear in one form or another very quickly." However, a wide variety of new archival sources and high-quality secondary scholarship from around the world suggest that, at least during the Cold War, Beijing's attempts to interfere in North Korean elite politics proved surprisingly ineffective. In 1956, China and the Soviet Union sent a joint delegation to convince Kim Il Sung, the founder of the regime, to reverse his decision to purge critics within the elite. Ten years later, the Chinese again took steps that threatened Kim's leadership. Understanding Kim Il Sung's resilience in the face of these challenges requires a new way of thinking about why authoritarian leaders are able to defeat their competitors. Kim did not emerge triumphant by co-opting potential detractors or paying them off, but by relying on his personal prestige as a partisan fighting against the Japanese in Manchuria and the personal connections he developed during that time period.

Bio:

Joseph Torigian studies Chinese, Russian, and North Korean politics and foreign policy. Joseph has worked at the Council on Foreign Relations and studied China's policies towards Central Asia as a Fulbright Scholar at Fudan University in Shanghai. He has conducted dissertation research at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow and as a visiting scholar at the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies at George Washington University. Before coming to Princeton, Joseph was a Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation. He received a BA in Political Science at the University of Michigan and a Ph.D in Political Science at MIT. Joseph speaks Chinese and Russian. His dissertation examined the internal power struggles fought by Nikita Khrushchev, Deng Xiaoping, and Kim Il Sung, with a focus on the military. At the China and the World Program, he will write on the co-evolution of nuclear doctrine in China and the Soviet Union and the 1969 Sino-Soviet border crisis.

Location:
Robertson Hall Bowl 001

Audience:
Open to the Public

Speaker(s):
Dr. Joseph Torigian 


PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND PUBLIC OPINION WARFARE: CHINESE THEORY AND PRACTICE - CWP FELLOW ANDREW CHUBB

Thu, Nov 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

Andrew Chubb Photo Headshot

The Contemporary China Graduate Colloquium will be meeting on Thursday, 11/9, in Wallace 165 from 6:30 to 8 PM. Our speaker will be Andrew Chubb, postdoctoral fellow in the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program. Dinner will be served at the meeting.

Public diplomacy and public opinion warfare: Chinese theory and practice

This paper details the PRC party-state’s development of theories that conceptualize domestic public opinion as a strategic or tactical resource in information-era conflicts. Since the early 2000s. the party-state’s focus on “partial conflicts under informatized conditions” has produced new and idiosyncratic concepts of public opinion warfare (舆论战) and public diplomacy (公共外交). While rooted in Maoist approaches emphasizing the necessity of constant mass mobilization, the newer concepts explicitly recognize that popular sentiments on contentious foreign policy issues can be an asset or a liability in different circumstances. Both concepts stress the importance of attenuating public discourse in accordance with the state’s immediate objectives in a dispute, and proactive management of the attendant risks to domestic stability and foreign policy objectives.

Location: Princeton University - Wallace Hall 165 Audience: Open to the Public


 

CHINA’S ANTI-AMERICANISM DURING THE KOREAN WAR - CWP FELLOW ALUMNI HE YINAN

Mon, Nov 13, 2017, 4:30 pm

Yinan He He yinan Lecture

DYinan He Photo CWP Alumniescription:

Anti-Americanism is not strange to students of modern Chinese history. But nothing compares to the all-out demonization of America during the Korean War, which marks the first, decisive turn in PRC attitude toward the US. This rabid outburst of anti-American rhetoric is traced to the sudden discovery of a heaven-sent opportunity by the Party leadership to inject boldness to the hitherto moderate and halting reforms at home toward Socialism. Riding the tide of the military conflict in Korea, the propaganda campaign forcefully propelled the new regime’s ideological warfare aimed at regime consolidation and social mobilization.

Bio:

Yinan He (何忆南) is an associate professor in the Department of International Relations at Lehigh University. She received her Ph.D. in political science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on politics of memory and reconciliation, East Asian international security, Chinese and Japanese foreign policy, and national identity mobilization and nationalism in East Asia. She is the author of The Search for Reconciliation: Sino-Japanese and German-Polish Relations since World War II (Cambridge University Press, 2009). The book is the first systematic, scholarly study on post-conflict interstate reconciliation. In addition to her fellowship from Princeton-Harvard China and the World program, She has held An-Wang Postdoctoral Fellow in Chinese Studies at Harvard University, John M. Olin Fellowship in National Security at Harvard University, Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar Fellowship of the United States Institute of Peace, MacArthur Fellowship on Transnational Security Issues, and Japanese Government Mombusho Scholarship sponsored by the University of Tokyo, among others. In 2011-2013, she was selected as a Public Intellectuas Program (PIP) fellow of the National Committee on United States-China Relations. In AY 2012-2013 she was a Visiting Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University. She holds a B.A. from Peking University and M.A. from Fudan University in international politics.

Location:
Robertson Hall Bowl 001

Audience:
Open to the Public

Speaker(s):
Dr. Yinan He 


Mary Kay Magistad

IS THERE A CHINESE INTERNATIONAL MODEL? THE BELT AND ROAD INITIATIVE AS A CASE STUDY. - CWP FELLOW MARIA ADELE CARRAI

Wed, Nov 29, 2017, 4:30 pm

Maria Adele Carrai

Description:

Despite the astonishing integration of China with the global world, its attitude toward the established international institutions and practices seems ambivalent. China’s economic, legal and political systems, in other words, seems sui generis, and its general behaviour and attitude toward the international economic and legal order has a certain degree of “exceptionalism” or divergence. This can be seen in its interactions with the WTO, where China has started to reinterpret some of the association’s legal concepts and challenge some of its practices, and in its attitude toward notions such as rule of law, democracy and human rights. This state of affairs seems to reflect rather than a simple deviance of China, a deeper lacuna in the current international economic and legal order, which seems unable to address the new geopolitical situation, in which China is rising as a great power. Given the systemic nature of the challenge that China imposes to the existing economic and legal order, it is essential to focus on what norms China is currently creating and how it is shaping them. In order to elaborate on the existence of a ‘China international model’, my research takes as a case study the Belt and Road Initiative. Despite all the possible security and financial obstacles, the BRI might have serious implications not only for the international economic legal order, but also for international politics, and it can reveal aspects of a Chinese international model that is likely to re-emerge.

Bio:

Maria Adele Carrai is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and recipient of a Marie Curie Fellowship at KU Leuven. Her research focuses on China’s legal history and how it affects China’s foreign policy. As a fellow at the China and The World Program she will look at China as a normative actor and its impact on the international economic and legal order, with a particular focus on the One Belt One Road.

Maria Adele was trained as a sinologist and political scientist in Italy (La Sapienza University, Ca’ Foscari University, University of Bologna), the UK (SOAS, Erasmus) and China (University of Hong Kong, CUPL). After receiving her PhD in 2016 at the University of Hong Kong, she held a Max Weber Fellowship at the European University Institute of Florence (2015-17) and was a Global Hauser Fellow at the New York University Law School (2016-17) and a visiting scholar at Columbia University (2017).

Her thesis “A Genealogy of Sovereignty in Modern China, 1840 - present” looks at how Chinese intellectuals, political figures and diplomats articulated the notion of sovereignty in their foreign policy during the period in question. The study, currently under peer review with Cambridge University Press for publication, reveals how China, in deviating from the teleology imposed by the West and actively appropriating and manipulating Western international legal norms, has emerged as a key actor in the globalization of international law.

Maria Adele’s general research interests include international law and relations, Western and Chinese legal and political philosophy, legal history, Chinese foreign policy. She is a native speaker of Italian, is fluent in Chinese and French, and has a basic knowledge of Japanese and Arabic.

Location:
Robertson Hall Bowl 001

Audience:
Open to the Public

Speaker(s):
Dr. Maria Adele Carrai  


 

CHINA'S ASSERTIVENESS IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA: MEASURING CONTINUITY AND CHANGE, 1970-2015 - CWP FELLOW ANDREW CHUBB

Wed, Feb 7, 2017, 4:30 pm

Andrew Chubb Headshot

Description:

This paper offers the first systematic assessment of the long-term continuities and changes in the PRC’s policy in the South China Sea dispute. To this end, it develops a much-needed typology of non-cooperative state actions in maritime disputes – declarative, demonstrative andcoercive – and applies this to an original time series of PRC actions there since 1970. This reveals that the most significant shift in China’s behavior in the South China Sea occurred in 2007 – much earlier than most analysis assumes – and has been ongoing since that time, a finding that has important implications for understanding its causes. In particular, it disconfirms nationalist public opinion, the Global Financial Crisis, and Xi Jinping as explanations for China's assertive turn in maritime Asia. Instead, the causes appear to have been largely structural: the PRC's increased relative power in its region, together with rapidly rising resource insecurity, and the arrival of specific maritime law enforcement capabilities constructed in response to the UNCLOS regime in the 1990s. The paper also shows the key difference between China’s past and present policies to be the introduction of qualitatively coercive actions, which account for almost all the change in the PRC’s overall level of activity in the disputed area. The methods and results presented here are relevant both to government policy analysis and the academic study of maritime disputes.

Bio:

Andrew Chubb researches the relationship between Chinese public opinion and PRC foreign policy, and its implications for international politics in East Asia. A graduate of the University of Western Australia, his doctoral dissertation examined the complex and evolving linkages between Chinese popular nationalism and government policy in the South China Sea. In 2012 he initiated a survey project to measure Mainland Chinese citizens' views of maritime disputes, and a blog providing translations and analysis of Chinese discourse on contentious foreign policy issues (southseaconversations.wordpress.com).

Beyond this core focus on maritime disputes and public opinion, Andrew's research interests include strategic communication, hybridity, and Chinese Communist Party history, with publications examining the 1978-1979 Democracy Wall movement, China's shanzhai culture, military propaganda in the internet era, and the role of foreigners on PRC television. His articles can be found in the Journal of Contemporary China, Pacific Affairs, Information, Communication & Society, Foreign Policy, East Asia Forum and elsewhere.

Location:
Robertson Hall Bowl 001

Audience:
Open to the Public

Speaker(s):
Dr. Andrew Chubb 


DEVELOPING A STRATEGIC RESPONSE TO CHINA'S BELT AND ROAD INITIATIVE - DAN KLIMAN, SENIOR FELLOW, CENTER FOR A NEW AMERICAN SECURITY

Thu, Feb 22, 2018, 4:30 pm

CISS CWP Event with Dan Kliman, Senior Fellow - Center for a New American Security

Daniel M. Kliman is the Senior Fellow in the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). He is an expert in Asia-Pacific strategy, with a particular focus on U.S. competition with China. Dr. Kliman is also an officer in the U.S. Navy Reserve.

Before joining CNAS, Dr. Kliman worked in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, where he served as Senior Advisor for Asia Integration. He was the principal Asia expert for development and implementation of the Third Offset strategy, and executed multiple international engagements focused on defense innovation. He also advised DoD leadership on maritime security issues.

Prior to his time at the DoD, Dr. Kliman worked at the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF), first as a Transatlantic Fellow, and then as a Senior Advisor with the Asia Program. At GMF, Dr. Kliman launched a new line of research on emerging powers. He also created the Young Strategists Forum, a program to educate emerging leaders from the United States, Japan, and other major democracies about geopolitical competition in the Asia-Pacific region.

Dr. Kliman has authored two books, Fateful Transitions: How Democracies Manage Rising Powers, from the Eve of World War I to China’s Ascendance, and Japan’s Security Strategy in the Post-9/11 World: Embracing a New Realpolitik. He has also published in prominent outlets such as The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Politico, Foreignpolicy.com, and CNN.com.

Dr. Kliman received a PhD in Politics from Princeton University and holds a BA in Political Science from Stanford University. He lives in Washington, DC, with his wife and daughter.

The CISS Policy Series brings prominent national security decision-makers to campus for discussions about the politics and policy of national and international security. Stay tuned for more events throughout the year!

Location:
Robertson Hall 001

Audience:
Open to the Public


2018 CWP WORKSHOP AT UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Thu, Mar 1, 2018 (All day) to Fri, Mar 2, 2018 (All day)

China in the World Schedule 2018 - External IMAGE

The day’s events are free, please register. Please go to cwp.princeton.edu

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This conference / workshop is made possible through the generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

CWP Workshop 2018 UMD Hotel Whole Group Photo


CCGC LECTURE "THE CHINA MODEL?" - CWP FELLOW MARIA ADELE CARRAI

Thu, Mar 8, 2018, 5:00 pm

Maria Adele Carrai CWP Princeton

Thursday, March 8 from 5-7 PM in Wallace 190. Dinner will be served at the meeting. Our speaker for this week will be Maria Adele Carrai, a postdoctoral fellow in the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program, who will be presenting a paper on the discourse of the China Model.

The Contemporary China Graduate Colloquium (CCGC)

With the support of the Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China, CCGC is an interdisciplinary seminar for graduate students in the humanities and social sciences who study contemporary (post-imperial) China and modern East Asia. We welcome students to present research projects (at any stage of development), or to rehearse conference presentations or practice job talks. If you would like to present at CCGC this semester or subscribe to our listserv, please send an e-mail to James Lee (JL18@princeton.edu) with the details of your request.

Lecture Abstract

The China model seems to be ubiquitous. It is coming back through the back door in disguise after leaving through the front. One of the most recent debate about the China model begun in 2008 with the publication of Ramo’s The China Model, which by many was already dismissed as a myth. But the concept continues to attract the attention of the public and scholars, sometimes to channel their anxiety for China global rise into an identifiable concept, and other times to conceptualize China’s distinctive developmental path and domestic system in more theoretical and cohesive terms. This paper treats China model as a discourse, in the Foucauldian sense, and shows how the discourse lacks cohesion and does not correspond to a China model the Chinese government is officially trying to promote outside of China. After having introduced the various discourses of the China model, both within and without China, the paper identifies three ways to operationalize and distinguish various China models. It concludes that besides the domestic and the economic developmental model, which are of uncertain success, there is not yet a China model of global governance, and that the ‘China model’ concept often heralds misunderstandings and bad policies.


GREAT DECISIONS 2018 - PRESENTATION BY CWP FELLOW ANDREW CHUBB.

Tue, Mar 13, 2018

Andrew Chubb Photo Headshot

In a roundtable discussion format, this lecture focuses on China and America: the New Geopolitical Equation. An outside expert, Dr. Andrew Chubb, will set up the topic in-advance followed by robust discussion by the group, moderated by co-facilitators. Leaders: Karen Coates and David Redman will again be the co-facilitators. Karen is a retired chemical engineer, and David is a retired Princeton University administrator.

Speaker Bio:

Andrew Chubb researches the relationship between Chinese public opinion and PRC foreign policy, and its implications for international politics in East Asia. A graduate of the University of Western Australia, his doctoral dissertation examined the complex and evolving linkages between Chinese popular nationalism and government policy in the South China Sea. In 2012 he initiated a survey project to measure Mainland Chinese citizens' views of maritime disputes, and a blog providing translations and analysis of Chinese discourse on contentious foreign policy issues (southseaconversations.wordpress.com).

Beyond this core focus on maritime disputes and public opinion, Andrew's research interests include strategic communication, hybridity, and Chinese Communist Party history, with publications examining the 1978-1979 Democracy Wall movement, China's shanzhai culture, military propaganda in the internet era, and the role of foreigners on PRC television. His articles can be found in the Journal of Contemporary China, Pacific Affairs, Information, Communication & Society, Foreign Policy, East Asia Forum and elsewhere.

Princeton Senior Resource Center:

The Princeton Senior Resource Center is a 501(c)(3) private non-profit organization founded in 1974 to provide programs and services to promote healthy aging for Princeton area older adults. PSRC was the first senior center in New Jersey to receive national accreditation in 1998. There is no paid membership required, and participation is open to all in the greater Princeton area.

The mission of PSRC is to be the go-to place where aging adults and their families find support, guidance, educational and social programs to help navigate life transitions and continue to be active, healthy, and engaged in the community. PSRC will collaborate with participants and other community organizations to address needs and current concerns of older adults and their families as well as to be responsive to emerging needs in this diverse community.

Andrew Chubb PSRC Princeton Senior Resource Center Flyer

"LONG SHADOWS OF HISTORY: CHINA, INTERNATIONAL LAW, AND ITS FUTURE AS A RULE MAKER" GEORGE HAMPTON - NEW ZEALAND DIPLOMAT

Wed, Mar 14, 2018

George Hampton New Zealand

Lecture: How has China historically approached questions of international law, and what does this suggest about its future role in shaping the international legal system?

China’s emergence as an economic giant and potential superpower affords it the ability and motive to be a significant determinant of the international rules-based system that underpins global peace and prosperity. This role merits a re-examination of China’s own early history with international law, including its initial encounters with Western conceptions of international law and China's adaptation to this system.

This lecture will review historic Chinese attitudes towards international law and assess how these have evolved and adapted in modern times. By examining this history it will also attempt to shed light on China’s future approach to international law and how it may shape the international legal system to come.

 

Bio: George Hampton is a New Zealand diplomat and the Senior Policy Adviser to the New Zealand Mission to the United Nations in New York. He previously served at the UN Security Council as a Peace and Security Expert and as Campaign Adviser to former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark during her candidacy for UN Secretary-General.

Until 2014 Mr Hampton was Deputy Permanent Representative to the UN in Vienna and Deputy Head of Mission at the Embassy of New Zealand to Austria, Hungary, Slovakia and Slovenia. He was previously a political advisor to the New Zealand Prime Minister and Private Secretary to New Zealand’s Cabinet Minister for Disarmament and Arms Control. His work in the New Zealand foreign service has included responsibility for Asia and Pacific affairs and international security.

Mr Hampton was named one of 20 young strategists globally in Geo-economics and Geo-security by Johns Hopkins University and the International Institute of Strategic Studies. He was selected by the New Zealand Leadership Institute as a Future Leader. In 2017 he was selected as a Carnegie New Leader by the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. He was previously selected as a New Zealand Future Leader by the New Zealand Leadership Institute.

Mr Hampton was a Fulbright Scholar to Columbia University, from which he graduated with a Master’s Degree in international economic policy and management. He holds Bachelor’s Degrees in law and history, and a First Class Honor’s Degree in diplomacy and international relations from the University of Canterbury.


“ACTIVE DEFENSE: CHINA’S MILITARY STRATEGY SINCE 1949” - MIT PROFESSOR & CWP ALUMNI - TAYLOR FRAVEL

Thu, Mar 29, 2018

Taylor Fravel

Taylor Fravel PhotoLecture: Since 1949, China has adopted nine national military strategies, known as “strategic guidelines.” The strategies adopted in 1956, 1980, and 1993 represent major changes in China's military strategy, or efforts by the People's Liberation Army (PLA) to wage war in a new way. Shifts in the conduct of warfare in the international system offer one explanation for why China, a developing country for most of this period, pursued major change in its military strategy. Such shifts in the conduct of warfare should be especially powerful if a gap exists between a state's current strategy and the requirements of future warfare. The PLA has only been able to change strategy, however, when the Chinese Communist Party leadership is united and agrees on basic policies and the structure of authority. When the party is united, it delegates substantial responsibility for military affairs to the PLA leadership, which changes or adjusts military strategy in response to changes in China's security environment.

Bio:

M. Taylor Fravel is Associate Professor of Political Science and member of the Security Studies Program at MIT. Taylor is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his PhD. He has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, a Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, a Fellow with the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, and The China Quarterly, and is a member of the board of directors for the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Maritime Awareness Project.

Location:
Robertson Hall

Audience:
Open to the Public


EVAN OSNOS SPEAKING AT CWP ON CHINA

Tue, Apr 10, 2018, 2:00 pm

Evan Osnos

Bio: Evan Osnos joined The New Yorker as a staff writer in 2008, and covers politics and foreign affairs. His recent subjects include the reconstruction of a train crash that exposed the underside of China’s boom; a group of Chinese tourists on their first trip to Europe; and a barber who set out to beat the house in Macau. For four years, he wrote the Letter from China for newyorker.com. Parts of his book, “Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China,” based on eight years of living in Beijing, first appeared in the magazine. The book won the 2014 the National Book Award in nonfiction and was a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction. He has also written from East Asia; his article “The Fallout” won a 2012 Overseas Press Club Award. Previously, he worked as Beijing bureau chief for the Chicago Tribune, where he was part of a team that won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting. Before his assignment to China, he worked in the Middle East, reporting mostly from Iraq. He has also contributed to “This American Life” and been a correspondent for “Frontline/World.” He is the recipient of the Osborn Elliott Prize and a Livingston Award for Young Journalists. His work is anthologized in “The Best American Writing on Nature and Science 2010,” “The Best Spiritual Writing 2012,” and “Chinese Characters: Profiles of Fast-Changing Lives in a Fast-Changing Land.”


ABRAHAM DENMARK - WILSON CENTER - "BEYOND NATIONALISM: CONSIDERING A CHINESE WORLD ORDER"

Wed, Apr 18, 2018, 4:30 pm

Abraham Abe Denmark

Abraham Denmark headshot

Abstract:

Xi Jinping has driven a significant evolution in major aspects of Chinese foreign and domestic policies. By considering these changes, outside observers may gain a more accurate appreciate of what a China-led world order may look like. China is emerging as a power never seen before: a wealthy, technocratic, and confident national security state based on the strictures of Leninism and with ambitions driven by a force beyond nationalism. China’s “civilizationalist” ambitions blur the lines between domestic and foreign affairs, and seek to ensure that the Chinese Communist Party is able to pursue its interests and prerogatives without restriction. A Chinese world order will therefore cast aside assumptions of liberal internationalism, and embrace a system founded on calculations of raw power, subtle influence, heterachy, and great power spheres of influence.

Bio:

Abraham M. Denmark is Director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, which conducts independent research and hosts frank dialogues to develop actionable ideas for Congress, the Administration, and the broader policy community on issues related to the Asia-Pacific. He also holds a joint appointment as a Senior Fellow at the Wilson Center's Kissinger Institute on China and the United States.


MARIA ADELE CARRAI - CWP FELLOW - "CHINA AND IT’S ROLE IN GLOBALIZATION AND INFLUENCE IN THE WORLD TODAY"

Wed, May 9, 2018, 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm

Maria Adele Carrai CWP Princeton

Bio:

Maria Adele Carrai (马晓冉) is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and recipient of a Marie Curie Fellowship at KU Leuven. Her research focuses on China’s legal history and how it affects China’s foreign policy. As a fellow at the China and The World Program she will look at China as a normative actor and its impact on the international economic and legal order, with a particular focus on the One Belt One Road.

Maria Adele was trained as a sinologist and political scientist in Italy (La Sapienza University, Ca’ Foscari University, University of Bologna), the UK (SOAS, Erasmus) and China (University of Hong Kong, CUPL). After receiving her PhD in 2016 at the University of Hong Kong, she held a Max Weber Fellowship at the European University Institute of Florence (2015-17) and was a Global Hauser Fellow at the New York University Law School (2016-17) and a visiting scholar at Columbia University (2017).

Her manuscript “A Genealogy of Sovereignty in Modern China from 1840” looks at how Chinese intellectuals, political figures and diplomats articulated the notion of sovereignty in their foreign policy during the period in question. The study in contract with Cambridge University Press for publication, reveals how China, in deviating from the teleology imposed by the West and actively appropriating and manipulating Western international legal norms, has emerged as a key actor in the globalization of international law.

Maria Adele’s general research interests include international law and relations, Western and Chinese legal and political philosophy, legal history, Chinese foreign policy. She is a native speaker of Italian, is fluent in Chinese and French, and has a basic knowledge of Japanese and Arabic.


CWP YOUNG SCHOLARS WORKSHOP - 'CHINA’S QUEST FOR SOVEREIGNTY: INTERNATIONAL LAW IN CHINA IN A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE'

Tue, May 29, 2018, 1:00 pm to 6:00 pm

China’s Quest for Sovereignty: International Law in China in a Historical Perspective

Young Scholars Workshop

Robinson Hall, Bowl 1, Princeton University

1- 6 pm, May 29, 2018

Modern international law was introduced in China in the course of the 19th century in the context of the Opium Wars and Western imperialism. The current system of international law, which developed largely among feuding European colonial powers, was translated and appropriated in China only from the mid-19th century. If now China is regarded as a stronghold of Westphalian sovereignty, as it would seem from its territorial sensitivities over Tibet, Xinjiang, Taiwan and disputed offshore islands, in the 19th century and in the Republican Era it struggled to re-define its vast imperial frontiers within new sovereign borders. This was due to the rich and complex existing relations that the Qing court had with its periphery and encroaching Western powers. Its inscription within a new sovereign contour gave rise to territorial disputes that are still very much alive today. According to the Constitution of the People’s Republic of China, the (re)unification of Chinese territory continues to be one of the fundamental objectives of the Chinese Communist Party. How did China approach questions of international law in general, and sovereignty in particular, historically from the late Qing period? What might this reveal about its past and present role in shaping the international legal order? The workshop “China’s Quest for Sovereignty: International Law in China in a Historical Perspective” explores the process of appropriation of international law by China in the course of the late Qing Dynasty, Republican Period and People’s Republic of China and how China has dealt with questions of sovereignty and jurisdiction with new legal instruments. Examining the history of international law in China also stands to provide insights about China’s future relationship with the international legal order. The workshop will give young scholars and academics an opportunity to present their work to a broader audience interested in China and international law, and receive constructive feedback on their work from scholars in related fields.


1.00 pm Opening Remarks by Prof. Jerome A. Cohen (Introduction by Maria Adele Carrai)

1.30 pm Panel 1: Translating International Law in a Plurality of Normative Orders
— Dr. Amanda Cheney (Lund University)

“Tibet Lost in Translation: Power Politics, Language and International Order Transformation at the Simla Convention, 1913-1914”
Commentator: Prof. Timothy Brook (University of British Columbia)

—Ling-Wei Kung (PhD Candidate, Columbia University)
“Translating Sovereignty: The Tibet Conventions between Britain and China, 1904-1906” Commentator: Prof. Yue Du (Cornell University)
— Aaron Glasserman (PhD Candidate, Columbia University)

“Changing Conceptions of Custom in Modern Chinese Islam”
Commentator: Dr. Maria Adele Carrai (China and the World Program, Princeton University)

3.00 pm Coffee Break

3.15 pm Panel 2: Defining Sovereignty

— Prof. Pär Cassel (University of Michigan)

“Sovereignty in China: The Careers of a Concept, from the late Qing to the PRC”
Commentator: Prof. Nicola di Cosmo (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton)

— Idriss Fofana (JD Candidate, Yale University/ PhD Candidate, Columbia University)

“The Duties of a Self-Respecting State: Qing China, Diminished Sovereignty and State Responsibility in the High Imperial International Order”
Commentator: Dr. Maria Adele Carrai (China and the World Program, Princeton University)

4.15 pm Coffee Break

4.30 pm Panel 3: Sovereignty in Contemporary Chinese Claims

— Dr. Andrew Chubb (China and the World Program, Princeton University)

“International law as a driver of confrontation: UNCLOS and China’s assertiveness in the South China Sea”
Commentator: Prof. Jerome A. Cohen (NYU)

— James Evans (Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University)

“Defying All Explanation? The Belt-Road Initiative’s Ambiguous Motivations”

Commentator: Nadège Rolland (The National Bureau of Asian Research)

5.30 pm Concluding Remarks

6.00 pm Dinner

Participants:

  • Prof. Timothy Brook (University of British Columbia)
  • Dr. Maria Adele Carrai (Postdoctoral Fellow, China and the World Program, Princeton University)
  • Prof. Pär Cassel (University of Michigan)
  • Dr. Amanda Cheney (Postdoctoral Fellow, Lund University)
  • Prof. Thomas Christensen (William P. Boswell Professor of World Politics of Peace and War and Director of the China and the World Program, Princeton University)
  • Dr. Andrew Chubb (Postdoctoral Fellow, China and the World Program, Princeton University)
  • Prof. Jerome A. Cohen (Professor of Law, Faculty Director of U.S.-Asia Law Institute, New York University)
  • Prof. Nicola di Cosmo (Luce Foundation Professor in East Asian Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton)
  • Prof. Yue Du (Visiting Assistant Professor New York University; Assistant Professor, Cornell University)
  • James Evans (Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University)
  • Idriss Fofana (JD Candidate, Yale University/ PhD Candidate, Columbia University)
  • Aaron Glasserman (PhD Candidate, Columbia University)
  • Ling-Wei Kung (PhD Candidate, Columbia University)
  • Nadège Rolland (Senior Fellow Political and Security Affairs, The National Bureau of Asian Research)
  • Teng Biao (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton)
  • Prof. Gray Tuttle (Leila Hadley Luce Associate Professor of Modern Tibetan Studies, Columbia University)
  • Prof. Madeleine Zelin (Dean Lung Professor of Chinese Studies, Columbia University)

Location:
Robertson Hall Bowl 001

Audience:
Open to the Public